NATIONAL HERITAGE

Menokin is a direct link to the Declaration of Independence and the founding of the Nation. In interpreting the many layers of history that comprise the Menokin site - from pre-Revolution, through Independence, wars, the Great Depression and current events - visitors make connections between themselves and the history that happened here.

NATIONAL HERITAGE

Menokin is a direct link to the Declaration of Independence and the founding of the Nation. In interpreting the many layers of history that comprise the Menokin site - from pre-Revolution, through Independence, wars, the Great Depression and current events - visitors make connections between themselves and the history that happened here.

NATIONAL HERITAGE

Menokin is a direct link to the Declaration of Independence and the founding of the Nation. In interpreting the many layers of history that comprise the Menokin site - from pre-Revolution, through Independence, wars, the Great Depression and current events - visitors make connections between themselves and the history that happened here.

EMPOWERMENT

The objective of our multi-disciplinary project across history, architecture and ecology is to empower visitors to make their own interpretations and consider their personal contributions and connections to history by learning about the diverse stories at Menokin.

People form new connections with Menokin that lead to the discovery of stories and links to the past. Evelyn Parker and her sister, Helen Juanita Wells, (pictured at right) are descendants of the Gordon family who were slaves at Menokin. 

We are working with the Gordon family to record oral histories and help them organize and publish their extensive geneaological research. 

Evelyn Parker (left) and her sister, Helen Juanita Wells, shared some of their family photos with Menokin staff.

Diverse Stories

locket in earth

The Locket

In 2009, archaeologists found a beautiful locket in the Menokin house ruin. This cameo locket portrays the image of a woman. Who did this locket belong to? Who is this woman?

Gordon family group

Family Portrait

The Gordon family – generations of this family worked the land at Menokin. Two Gordon descendants (pictured above), visited Menokin and shared their family photographs with the staff. Plans have been made to record their stories and memories for the Menokin archives.

Dining room in 1930

Time Capsule

Menokin’s dining room was photographed in 1930 by Frances Benjamin Johnston. This Depression Era image is a glimpse into the sparse simplicity of the house’s furnishings.

REFLECTION

Menokin provides a real opportunity for visitors to forge inherent, emotional connections between the landscape, stories, and house. Explore the landscape and harken back to the American Indians who first used the land and gave Menokin its name. Learn about the terraced gardens and tobacco rolling roads to understand how Menokin would have been used in Francis Lightfoot Lee’s time. Gaze on the house as it stands today and reflect on the history of Menokin that is represented here, and how it continues to shape our national heritage through innovative thinking and bold ideas.

REFLECTION

REFLECTION

Menokin provides a real opportunity for visitors to forge inherent, emotional connections between the landscape, stories, and house. Explore the landscape and harken back to the American Indians who first used the land and gave Menokin its name. Learn about the terraced gardens and tobacco rolling roads to understand how Menokin would have been used in Francis Lightfoot Lee’s time. Gaze on the house as it stands today and reflect on the history of Menokin that is represented here, and how it continues to shape our national heritage through innovative thinking and bold ideas.

REFLECTION

Menokin provides a real opportunity for visitors to forge inherent, emotional connections between the landscape, stories, and house. Explore the landscape and harken back to the Native Americans who first used the land and gave Menokin its name. Learn about the terraced gardens and tobacco rolling roads to understand how Menokin would have been used in Francis Lightfoot Lee’s time. Gaze on the house as it stands today and reflect on the history of Menokin that is represented here, and how it continues to shape our national heritage through innovative thinking and bold ideas.

row by corn field

NATURAL HERITAGE

Menokin’s lands contain a mixture of lawn, agricultural field and forest. The open, farmed land is mildly sloped, while the forests contain many steep slopes, some narrow ravines and an abundance of spring-fed rivulets.

Menokin’s natural setting supports a rich and diverse wildlife and provides a great opportunity to experience and learn about the natural world in different ways as well as forging connections with this ancient Native American land.